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Re: Re: Re: Re: Getting Under 10's to talk and communicate?


I find that my kids talk like crazy at practice, but much of it is just your usual name with the odd bit of information thrown in, these are u-13's tho, yet come the saturday this 'talk' becomes more limited. I have found that at this age group getting in and 'playing alongside' a player helps, as they can often learn from your example, you say "now i can hear you, and look how it helps your mates", once their a little confident, move on to the next playing position. Explain how you will help them to the team first, and that they are alllowed to mess-up to get the confidence and experience. I do agree with Nick that some never will, and at 10 it's a hard call to ask them, but sometimes their response is suprising, most kids really start 'talking' at youth levels and when they start playing around adults

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Don't expect kids to do this at the age group you are working with, for many players it NEVER happens, it's just part of development! You won't have the miracle answer, it's like stopping kids bunching, it's just the way they are made and the mental and brain development at this age! Just enjoy them playing footy!

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As the kids get older they do get louder, small sided games are perfect for this communication experience. A great game I like is where I set up four mini goals around the centre circle, approximately 2 feet wide. Limit the area of play from box to box and the usual touch line, if it goes off it's a throw. Seperate into two teams, no limit on touches however, a goal is scored when a player plays a pass through the goal to a team mate. Make sure that once a goal has been scored in one goal that they move on to the next in order to score, this helps with communication as the kids will have to be vocal to score! and they will want to do that more than anything!, also helps with passing and awareness. If you want further explanation please get in contact, especially if I havn't been very clear. Ian


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I manage an under nine team and have similar problems. During a practice game if someone does communicate I would stop the game and let the players know he/she has done well by what they have said, even if it a simple phrase like man on or watch your back. As the game goes on you notice more of them talking because I am stopping the game and praising them! Also tell them about how the players on match of the day talk to each other - set them a task - get them to tell you at your next session which player talked the most on match of the day.

Happy coaching!!

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I have just taken over as assistant coach for an under 10's side of kids.

In the past they have been coached by ex rugby players and none of the coaches have played soccer before.

I come from a long line of soccer players and have some fairly good skills and credentials.

However I am having a little bit of difficulty translating what i know to the kids.

Some of the kids have some fantastic skills individually but as a team there are problems.



The one thing i can see i that they do not communicate, no one talks. I can see 2 or three players that can read the game and position themselves according to play, one of them i have put into the defensive line to strengthen it. however I want to get him to talk and communicate what he see to the other players. I have tried telling him he is "Captain" of defense to give him confidence and let him know that he has the skills, and asked time and time again for him to tell his players where he needs them.

Can anyone suggest any way i can get the players to practice their onfield communication?

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i want to become a coach - by charles kwadwo ... - Jul 31, 2003 7:32pm